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  • HiLo Catskill / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Nina Isabelle Opening at HiLo CATSKILL, NY ​ MAY 2017 Nina Isabelle, with her signature gusto, will be presenting an evening of intrigue, education, and hullabaloo. Arm wrestling, The Overconfident Autodidact (performed by Erik Hokanson,) a tea party performance by Valerie Sharp, a public interview with the questioner another performance artist (Matthew Gioia,) and two documentary screenings- The Eucharist Machine and Time Travel Research Documentary.. Nina Isabelle's installation will be at HiLo from now until June 5. It can be viewed M-F 7am-2pm and Sat & Sun 9am - 4pm until May 3rd after which time the hours will be M-Tu 7-2, W-Th 7 -4, Fri 7am-12am, Sat 7-12am, Sun 9am - 10pm Out of gallery

  • BEAST CONJURING | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... BEAST CONJURING at Paul McMahon's ​ MOTHERSHIP Woodstock, NY January 16-21, 2018 ​ L orene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, & Jennifer Zackin On January 21, 2018 performers at Paul McMahon's Mothership in Woodstock, NY work to conjure the sea beast from the book of Revelation. ​ The "Beast Conjuring" performance intended to conjure and kill the sea beast from the book of Revelation. A group of artists and performers were invited to simultaneously interweave their own processes and intentions as a way to generate energies that might be focused toward the common goal of beast conjuring. Together the group worked to build and maximizing the physical, sensory, and psychic spaces that bind the internal and external dimensions of awareness through performative modes of sound making, movement, object construction, and ceremonial-like gestures in a process that became an inquiry into how a metaphoric conjure-and-kill scenario might translate or become useful in a literal dimension where such things are less possible-seeming. ​ "Beast Conjuring" was performed within an installation including ten hand-fabricated crowns, ten cedar root horns dug from local woods, hand painted imagery of the seven-headed ten-horned beast, a suspended hand-sewn white linen angel, a reconstructed domestic scene from the home of an ex-evangelical and a giant edible Whore of Babylon cake as bait. Lorene Bouboushian read personal text and improvised sound and movement, Linda Mary Montano performed a holy water blessing as Chicken Linda, Brian McCorkle produced sound using a Saxophone and his specially designed Beast Box, (a noise machine built with raspberry-pi based software that cast neural nets for soul retrieval,) Jennifer Zackin engaged in a task-based performance to weave a beast trapping vortex, Ever Peacock and I performed an acoustic rendition of Larry Norman's *You've been Left Behind* thirteen consecutive times all awash in Miles Pflanz's video remake of the 2014 American Christian apocalyptic thriller film *Left Behind* (based on the bestselling novels by Tim Lahaye and Jerry B. Jenkins) that reframes durational performance art as post-apocalyptic living. ​ It's difficult to gauge the effectiveness of a performance conglomerate like "Beast Conjuring" due to its potential to be made to mean multiple things by participants and observers and the ripples of their combined experiences and energies. At the same time, the ability of a situation to evade meaning is exciting. No literal beast popped out of the floor, no politicians were struck dead and there weren't any recognizable or even loosely associated repercussive events of cosmic significance but the usefulness and appeal of such a process seems to unfurl over time in a circular and translucent way that generates unanswerable questions and hints at the possibilities and potential of less realistic thinking and doing. Beast Conjuring at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene, Nina, & Jen Zackin The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Beast Conjuring KILL Paper Collage 22x30 (rubberized paint, gouache, ash, enamel, watercolor) By Nina Isabelle Miles Pflanz at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Brian McCorkle, Nina Isabelle The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia The Beast at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership7509 The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia NAI_7452 Nina Isabelle, Ever Peacock The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia The Beast at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Linda Mary Montano in Beast Conjurin The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Ever Peacock at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia The Beast at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Linda Mary Montano The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Jennifer Zackin, Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Linda Mary Montano at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Jennifer Zackin, Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle, Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene Bouboushian at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene Bouboushian at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene & Nina at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene Bouboushian at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Brian McCorkle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle and Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Bouboushian, Isabelle, Peacock The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle and Paul McMahon The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia

  • FEEDING THE ENTITY | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FEEDING THE ENTITY MARCH 2015 Clara Diamond & Nina Isabelle Feeding The Entity explores the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint.

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // CODE

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... C O D E February 22, 2016 In response to Apple’s battle with the FBI over a federal order to unlock the iPhone of a mass shooter, C O D E looks at the differences between humans and machines and the difference between how these systems reveal or encrypt data through programming and intention. ​

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // The Woodstock Library

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE WOODSTOCK LIBRARY FLOATING BOUNCY CHAIR JUNE 2016 For the 85th Annual Woodstock Library Fair Hudson Valley artists were commissioned to repurpose a heap of old metal folding chairs for a silent auction to benefit the library. I made this floating bouncy chair using studio scraps and discount bungee cords from P&T Surplus in Kingston, NY. Fellow artist and Vice President of Friends of The Woodstock Library Michael Hunt says “It's the coolest motherfucking chair.”

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Kingston, NY

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MISC. VIDEO e845 / November 7, 2016 ​ ​ Candle Sounds / July 16, 2016 ​ ​ The Hollow Stump / November 7, 2016 ​ ​ Domestic Loops / November 1, 2016 ​ ​ At The Ashokan Reservoir / March 2016 ​ Double Slit July 16, 2016 1:01 ​ Referencing the magical incantation “As above, so below” from Hermetic Alchemy and Thomas Young’s original Double-Slit Experiment from 1801, Double Slit asks- does science suggest that man’s actions on earth might parallel actions within infinite multiple invisible lateral physical dimensions? ​ The Long Sounds That Pull December 5, 2016 7:00 ​ This is modified sensory input that has been stretched between several physical and psychic locations referencing a double decade point three cassette recorded postal anniversary edition. The original human mouth sound recording was placed in a landfill located at latitude 38.643708 / longitude -107.006703 ​ The Story Of Terror / The Ax In The Stump March 16, 2016 3:16 ​ The Ax in The Stump tells the story of Terror- as both a fabled horse from a North Indian Fairy Tale and the torture that can ride through family histories for generations.

  • SEEMRIPPER | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SEEMRIPPER A conceptual video-performance demonstrating artist as self replicator The Elizabeth Foundation As Far As The Heart Can See Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez October 2018 Seemripper was produced using The Self-Limiting Conceptual Video Production Process; a system that interlaces action, duration, direction, speed, sound, color, sequence, subject and object to form a linear audio and visual arrangement. The Self-Limiting Conceptual Video Production Process was designed as a system to sidestep consciousness in order to access lateral dimensions of awareness and is a continuation of The Video Manifestation System released by Human Trash Dump in January 2018. The video-performance frames the artist as a self replicator caught in a recursive loop of infinite destruction and renewal generated by the physical and quantum relationships between fire, water, air, metal and earth. This project was initiated by Linda Mary Montano as part of 'In Honor Of,' a performance series Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful with curatorial fellow JP - Anne Giera at The Elizabeth Foundation in New York City on October 20, 2018. Performers were nominated by artists featured in 'As Far As The Heart Can See' (Nao Bustamante, Billy X. Curmano, Irina Danilova & Project 59, Beatrice Glow, Ivan Monforte, Linda Mary Montano, Praxis (Delia & Brainard Carey), Beth Stephens & Annie Sprinkle, and Martha Wilson & Franklin Furnace Archive) and include former mentees, current students, assistants and younger artists whose work they admire: Elena Bajo Bajo, Sindy Butz, Larissa Gilbert, Nina Isabelle and Xinan (Helen) Ran.

  • CERTAIN SOLUTIONS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... CERTAIN SOLUTIONS FOR DISSOLVING PROBLEMS CZONG INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART GIMPO, KOREA / AUGUST , 2016 Certain Solutions For Dissolving Problems August 21, 2016 8:39 Certain Solutions For Dissolving Problems compiles digital imagery, audio, photography, and writing from The Superfund Re-Visioning Project into a video that addresses the failure of language and processes used to confront social and political issues such as environmental contamination. Using subtle neurolinguistic programming tactics combined with inaudible frequencies this video implants the idea of psychic reprogramming as a possible solution to artistic process displacement and underutilized artistic visions within the financial and political structures intended to remediate environmental contamination. In September 2016 Certain Solutions for Dissolving Problems was exhibited in an exhibition called Artist and Location at The Czong Institute For Contemporary Art in Gimpo, Korea.

  • CONTACT | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE TO NINA A. ISABELLE'S QUARTERLY EMAIL TO CONTACT NINA A. ISABELLE USE THE MESSAGE FORM BELOW: Email sent to Nina A. Isabelle Send

  • F.A.G at OLD GLENFORD CHURCH | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FEMINIST ART GROUP (F.A.G) HURLEY, NY ​ SEPTEMBER 1-4, 2017 ​ ​ THE OLD GLENFORD CHURCH STUDIO IV Castellanos, Amanda Hunt, Miette, Anya Liftig, Elizabeth Lamb, Jodie Lyn Kee Chow, Lorene Baboushian, Valerie Sharp, Kate Hamberger, Linda Montano, Ernest Goodmaw, Jennifer Zackin, Clara Diamond, Nina Isabelle ​ Out of gallery

  • SILVER GELATIN PRINTS (1989-1999) | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SILVER GELATIN PRINTS 1989-1999 A Collection of gelatin silver prints made from photograms, handmade negatives, and experimental darkroom photographic processes. Mother Selenium toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print Selenium toned silver gelatin print 7x9 toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print Selenium toned silver gelatin print 7x9 toned silver gelatin print prismacolor on toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print sepia toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print Selenium toned silver gelatin print 7x9 1/1

  • MOTHERING / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOTHERING NINA A. ISABELLE, EVER Z. PEACOCK, & SYLVIA ​ ROSEKILL PERFORMANCE ART FARM ROSENDALE, NY JUNE 3, 2017 MOTHERING looks at a child's nonverbal perception of the unspoken or hidden in relation to the improbability of a hierarchal god or mother. Multilayered family video and sound are projected onto a quasi-defunct Airstream trailer behind the south barn at Rosekill Performance Art Farm while Mother and Son perform with gestural sound-loops and shrouded interpretive movement.

  • Nina A. Isabelle // The Random Community Generator

    Nina Isabelle HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... RCG1-1 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-2 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-3 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-4 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-5 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-6 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-7 RCG1-8 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-9 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-10 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-11 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-12 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-13 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-14 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-15 18x26, oil on canvas The Random Community Generator February 24, 2014 by Matthew Gioia The Random Community Generator is an interactive project designed to generate a random community of 15 people who, by either purchasing or bartering for one of the pieces in the series, agree to become acquainted with the owners of the paintings which come before and after theirs in the series. The series is itself a “community” of 15 visceral and boldly colored 18x26 oil paintings. Energetic and defiantly opaque, the paintings contain aggressive elements which thrust themselves off the painted surface, longing for release into the third dimension. Discreet rivers and pockets of luminous color saturate the canvas beneath criss-crossing paths of uncertain trajectory. Yet despite their apparent abstraction, there is a creeping sense that the paintings are actually a concrete rendering of the vertiginous tumult of impulse, image, and ancient emotion that swirls just below the more or less ordered surface of human consciousness; the tumult which divides the world from our knowledge of it. Produced as one massive painting by hanging 15 canvases in a tight row and applying elements in a sequential manner from beginning to end, the series expresses varying degrees of chance and manipulation which interplay within each piece as well as throughout the collective whole. Thus, the paintings are separate yet inextricably linked by elements which move ecstatically across multiple canvases. Taken as a whole, the project is a map of a mind, which is - in the first and the last instance - communal, complex and messy, organized by the logic of dreams. The interactive component of the series is laid out as a social and interpersonal experiment designed to facilitate an examination of the perception of separateness and identity. First, the project asks, “can a randomly generated or accidental community be as meaningful - or even more meaningful than a community based on occupation, convenience, interest, or faith?" And then the Community Generating begins dealing in ideas, and tips into abstraction. By challenging our stagnant definitions of community, the project asks us to look at the division between our private and public life, between the kind of community we would most like to be a part of and the kind of community we actually create, and between the people we are, the people we think we are, and the people other people think we are. Indeed, the Random Community Generator, by its process of creation as much as by its experimental distribution plan, generates profound questions: is there any such thing as a distinct individual? What comprises a person? How do people overlap, echo, mirror, and create each other, consciously and otherwise? The paintings will disband, but could it ever be possible to really know any one of them without knowing the others?

  • Handmade book by Nina Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Handmade Book 1992 7x9 ​ This book was made using vintage photos, construction paper, and resin coated photo paper sent through a Xerox machine, map scraps, and electrical, scotch, and masking tape. I used a sewing machine to stitch it together. The book had been in storage for years and I decided to document it. ​ ​

  • AARON PIERCE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Aaron Pierce February 2017 ​ A: I am a graduate from Utah Valley University and I am writing a dissertation for the university's biannual Art History Symposium. The topic of discussion this year is Maximalism. I am particularly focusing on performance art as the contemporary medium that is reinventing museum spaces and engaging audiences by stimulating the senses more through music, dance, film, and painting combined. That is where your exhibit Animal Maximalism came to my attention. I am completely intrigued and enthralled by your performance art pieces and projects you have created. For this paper, I would love to have your view on performance art and Maximalism. I am interested in hearing some of your methods about performance art and Maximalism. It is rare in art history to be able to have contact with the artist, hence my excitement. If you do not mind sharing your opinion, I would like to know how you feel performance art engages audiences and pushes them to connect on a higher level to art? Also, why are we seeing a shift towards more performance art pieces in museums and galleries? I feel that audiences want to have a full sensory experience. How does Maximalist performance art achieve this better than other medium of art? ​ N: I practice a process of allowance where I let myself do what I want. This approach results in maximum data and action. By letting myself engage with an array of modalities I can generate multiple outcomes and possibilities. Because I'm not limited to any single mode of involvement, I'm free to use painting, performance, photography, or video or a mixture of modalities as I find necessary depending on my agenda and instinct. This suits my athletic, resourceful, and determined nature. ​ I approach performance art in the same way I would approach any other art modality- by paying close attention to gut instincts and psychic impressions in a process designed to override cerebral programming. The aim is always to align action with intention, and make note of the findings and outcome along the way. Performance art is a good choice when the concept I'm grappling with calls for a human body, action, or a narrative to actuate the outcome, especially literal concepts like worshiping the golden calf or using blood to cleanse things. My body can become a tool, a stand-in, or effigy of or for the viewer, creating a point of commonality to facilitate access. Aligning action with intention is also a way to re-frame ritual and an attempt to validate the effectiveness of approaches historically relegated to realms of religious structures and beliefs. I was recently invited to teach an art theory class for kids at The Hudson Valley Sudbury School. Through our discussions it emerged that the students felt most drawn to art practices and outcomes that suited the nature, mentality, and necessity of the individual artist. For instance they could relate to how Chuck Close became successful at painting faces as a result of his lifelong struggle with a facial recognition disorder. In reflecting on my personal method it occurs to me that my mode of operation is dictated by my nature, I didn't choose to function within the Maximalism approach and philosophy, it's just that the philosophy happens to align with my nature. I'm a serial over-doer of all things who relishes the opportunity to push things too far. My work is reactionary because I'm a reactionary person. For instance the first time I encountered minimalism I was ready to explode in a thousand directions. And, as an art student I couldn't help but challenge typical art professor's slogans such as "You have to know when to stop." Of course I could recognized the academically dictated stopping point but I would never in a million years stop there. I've always felt that learning how to challenge, push, or destroy something is a valid study when handled respectfully and with intention. ​ Performance art is an another mode of operating for artists to use in order to find or generate new information, to experiment with creating new experiences, or to try to express something they otherwise couldn't. It can engage the viewer in an intimate way offering the potential to build powerful experiences as it facilitates a space that can involve and include the viewer in a novel physical or psychic way. It's possible that since performance art inhabits walking space where gallery-goers would otherwise be moving about, a psychic connection is created by sharing the same space. As viewers, we know less about what it would be like to hang motionless on a wall. Performance art offers a platform for artists to practice aligning action with intention, a way to possibly re-frame ritual and to build experimental new models for of control or power to replace outmoded religious structures and beliefs. But also, It's possible the performance art trend might be a way for artists to backhandedly confront consumerism and elitism simultaneously, or at least to create the illusion of doing so. Commercial galleries and academic environments can be market driven or exclusive, but performance art has the ability to dissolve those traditional notions and to expand viewership by engaging broader mentalities in a way that would be difficult for strictly visual work focused on heady concepts or dollar amounts. And since we live in a culture of visual bombardment, where viewer's digitally conditioned eyes and minds are increasingly savvy, and in conjunction with consumer programming, we need something that can function both inside of and outside of commercial gallery and academic paradigms. There is a literal dissolution of boundaries. Since performance art is impervious to ownership and commodification, it pushes against market-driven capitalist structures and challenges a system where finances determine success. Issues of marketability, ownership, or commodity all come into play because its difficult to financially capitalize off of performance art. So, maybe it's like most trends- timely and culturally necessity. ​ I developed the Animal Maximalism exhibition concept as a way to bombard the human sensory input manifold with the intention of revealing cloaked information. I use the word "Animal" as an homage to instinct. For me academia operated through reversal, fueling my defiance more than refining me the way school is supposed to, so part of my mission has always been to build legitimate framework for us animals, one that is less cage-like, and Maximalism is a good framework for that agenda. I try to work within and build upon systems that already exist that might reflect and support my authentic nature, and to allow my work to reflect and be a response to the full spectrum of my body's biologic manifestation of its own history within its cultural environment. Maximalism feels like science-fiction, in that it offers the potential for system building where the inward personal landscape can travel all the way outward through the giant jumbled experience of collective household, community, country, and planetary psychic connections. Maybe performance offers an easier access point to the viewer in that we can all relate to each other as humans who are human shaped and have human form. We all share common ways of moving our human forms through space. It's possible that performance could function to create a portal, like a way out or a way in.

  • SILENT MASS GENERATOR | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE SILENT MASS GENERATOR WORKSHOP GES #411 ARCHIVE SPACE ​ NOVEMBER 6, 2015 The Silent Mass Generator Workshop incorporated the public to assemble, build and incorporate physical mass within an experimental simulated mindfulness environment. The duration of the workshop spanned 5 hours and 44 minutes inside of The Grace Exhibition Space Shirt Factory Studio #411. There was no speaking, eating, or drinking. Participation was not required, participants were free to come and go, or stay for a portion of the workshop. The workshop was designed to distract the subconscious mind by the tedium of cutting, ripping, and tying material to form long strands in order to facilitate the entry into a mindful, meditative, psychic space. The project explored the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint. An experimental soundscape designed with Christina Amelia Diamond acted as an electronic gong wash intended to initiate 23 cycles of ordered energetic body activation using specific Hz. Other auditory Information within the noise composition was generated by The Entity. Speaking was disallowed at The Silent Mass Generator Workshop. The Entity thanks Jeanie Antonelle, Undine Brod, Leonard Fujiyama, Hillary Harvey, Mor Pipman, and Christina Varga for their contribution of materials. CALL FOR MATERIAL DONATIONS ​ SEPTEMBER 25, 2015 The Entity seeks donations of scrap, waste, or unsellable materials such as fabric cut-offs, twine, rolled or spooled material, rope, ribbon, thread, or anything that is in long strands or could be cut and tied to form long strands. The nature of the project has lead to the present development of an official CALL FOR DONATED MATERIALS. The Entity also seeks donations of traditional artist’s materials as well as non-toxic industrial materials which might be repurposed. The upcoming phase of the project includes an opportunity for community participation with an interactive component in the form of a silent workshop intended to build physical mass through the hands-on manipulation of donated material. The workshop will be free and open to the public. FEEDING THE ENTITY ​ MARCH 2015 Feeding The Entity explores the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint.

  • SHAPE OF A FEELING

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SHAPE OF A FEELING Photographs of Piles by Nina Isabelle COLLECTION STARTED NOVEMBER 12, 2018 Out of gallery

  • FORCE YOURSELF TO BE GOOD | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FORCE YOURSELF TO BE GOOD Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY May 24, 2018 ​ Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL IMG_9611 Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle / /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself to be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Trauma Trap

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... LOCATIONAL TRAUMA TRANSFORM JUNE 23, 2016 The Locational Trauma Transforming Trap was constructed by Neva & Nina Isabelle as an action to align with the intention of absorbing and transforming physical trauma such as broken bones, head injury, and the visual implant of witnessing blood as well as emotional and physical damage to the bodies and psyches of friends and family. A handwoven trauma trap was constructed using black silk. Coated with gymnastics chalk, The Trauma Trap was used to absorb and transform trauma located at 40.8987° N, 77.3561° W. The contaminated trap was then hand washed in a mountain spring in order do dislodge the traumas from multiple physical geographic and bodily locations. One participant reports that the best tricks she learned in Gymnastics was "how to not feel pain."

  • PSYCHIC SELF DEFENSE SCULPTURE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... PSYCHIC SELF DEFENSE GIANT WOODEN STAKE FOR DESTROYING PSYCHIC VAMPIRES Out of gallery Inspired by Dion Fortune's Psychic Self-Defense: The Classic Instruction Manual for Protecting Yourself Against Paranormal Attack published in 1930, I carved an 11' wooden stake from a white pine tree removed from my property and designed a welded steel foundation to support and direct its potential in a specific way. There was a nearly dead forty-five foot tall white pine tree on my property that I needed to remove because it was next to a home with a newborn. I was overwhelmed by its potential for destruction as well as the terror at having to take responsibility. I feared it might smash a building or kill someone but I felt frozen to take action. Normally, I figure out a way to do things myself, but in this case I knew I had no ability to take down such a tree and I was having trouble finding a tree service who was able to schedule the job during the pandemic. I was also paralyzed by the thought of the expense. I wanted to run away, but knew I had to transform my fear and helplessness. I had the idea to approach the problem as an art project as a way to reconnect with my boldness and to remember the feeling of embodying initiative. Once I realized that I could apply methods from my art practice to this life circumstance, art became my teacher, and I began to hear the tree speaking to me saying "Look at me, I'm a giant wooden stake and I want to help you!" At the same time, I was rereading Dion Fortune's book Psychic Self-Defense: The Classic Instruction Manual for Protecting Yourself Against Paranormal Attack published in 1930 where she discusses the literal manifestation of vampiric energies and vampires themselves as people, circumstances, experiences, and entities that deplete us for their own gain. I had read the book as a young person and was now surprised to realize how her description of this system had maintained its relevance and how it paralleled the language of healthy boundaries as discussed in contemporary psychology. Vampiric energies accumulate through life experiences and interactions with other people and entities who intentionally or not connect their psyche to us. Unhealthy past relationships, traumas, and global events like the pandemic have the potential to develop longterm harmful effects on our beings and we need to develop tools to combat this dynamic. Thinking and working this way is one way art processes can help us. I designed, built, and activated the tree into a large healing tool sculpture that can neutralize the effects of psychic vampirism and other unhealthy energetic connections that impact our wellbeing. To start, I stripped the bark off of an eleven-foot length of the white pine and my son helped me with his chainsaw to carve one end into a sharp point. The base is a prism made of two welded steel equilateral triangle structures that elevate and position the point of the sculpture directly at heart level maximizing its power to blast away the psychic and etheric connections one inadvertently accumulates throughout life. The sculpture is a giant cleansing machine. It targets etheric and energetic fields and tethers that become attached to ones outer bodies over time. It's meant to cleanse the outer bodies by obliterating unhealthy energies and connections, prohibit vampiric energies from sinking their fangs into the many dimensions of our psychic, physical, mental and emotional spheres, and to destroy the parasitic relationship dynamic vampires establish and maintain with our physical host bodies against our will and awareness. The sculpture is interactive. People were invited to stand in front of it, connect with its design, and have their own healing experience. ​ ​ MAY 1 - 29, 2021 ART/LIFE INSTITUTE 185 ABEEL ST. KINGSTON, NY ​ ​ OPENING MAY 1st 6:PM - 9:PM MID-MONTH RECEPTION - MAY 15th 6:PM - 9:PM CLOSING EVENT MAY 29th - 6:PM - 6:PM ​ ​

  • STAGES / Clara Diamond / Nina A. Isabelle /Valerie Sharp / GREENKILL

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... STAGES CLARA DIAMOND, NINA A. ISABELLE, & VALERIE SHARP GREEN KILL, KINGSTON, NY APRIL 15, 2017

  • EXPERIMENTAL ARCHERY | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Out of gallery EXPERIMENTAL ARCHERY & MARKMAKING WORKSHOP ​ @ ​ R O S E K I L L June 10, 2017

  • WHISTLE PORTRAITS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... WHISTLE PORTRAITS By Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin HiLo Catskill June 10, 2018 ​ ​ During these dangerous / confusing / armageddonned times we are all looking for connection, understanding, and warmth. The three of us are committed to providing public art medicine. ART=LIFE=ART. For WHISTLE PORTRAITS at HiLo, we invite audience member-collaborators to sit with us and receive a public art healing. ART HEALS!!! - Linda Mary Montano photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve

  • HYMN WARP TRANSDUCER | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE HYMN WARP TRANSDUCER The Hymn Warp Transducer was performed as part of Paul McMahon's Woodstock Invitational for The Bedstock / 👁❤️🦄 Exhibition. ​ 9 Herkimer Place in Brooklyn, NY APRIL 15, 2018 ​ Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / Documentation: Amelia Iaia. ​ Using mouths, machines and tools to convert internal physical sound qualities into noisy output and a visual heap, Appalachian Abacus Haste melds converted hymns with Ever Peacock’s spooky loop-slide guitar sounds and Simon Ampel's rhythms while Nina Isabelle frames the operation in a warped slipshod suffocation structure. ​ Hymn Warp Transducer Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer, Nina Isabelle Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer, Nina Isabelle Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Hymn Warp Transducer, Nina Isabelle Concept & Performance: Nina Isabelle / Slide Guitar: Ever Peacock / Vocals: Abacus Haste / Rhythm: Simon Ample / 2D Art: Paul McMahon / Documentation: Amelia Iaia Show More

  • MOSS ROCK CAGE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOSS ROCK CAGE April 2020 Moss covered rock welded into hand-bent steel cage sold for a fundraising effort for HiLo Art in Catskill, NY during the pandemic.

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